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everything in the press that has been written, and they feel that the november trip to the u.n. was so successful that they are willing to go to the icc. when you say that israel may build this bottleneck area linking north and south, they say, fine. the more palestinians you talk to who believe that it is either final status or bust, and buss means the u.n., and not interested in any sort of coordinated unilateral agreement, it is a dirty word there, you are really seeing confidence. i personally hope the president in his stay over there is able to talk to the president over there and speak to them about the limitations of that strategy two could go to the icc. israelis say they're going to the icc. that could tie them up for years in legal proceedings. i do not see how any of this brings peace. i'm concerned about it. i'm also concerned about decision making, i'm concerned about the isolation of prime minister fayyat. the palestinian press does not report on his activities anymore. on the one hand, the good news is that more money has arrived lately. since obama is coming, of course
mean, we were his ally. >> it's good to -- today is to remember the warnings of u.n. weapons inspector hans blitz. it's a day to acknowledge the admonitions of leaders like general anthony zeni. eric shen who was forced into retirement when he disagreed with the bush cheny strategy. if we are truly remembering what it was like ten years ago today, we can't forget the millions of voices who opposed this war and attempts made to margin liz them. if you were a public figure, it was not a wise time to speak out against the administration. actress jeanne was called an iraqi sympathizer. >> saddam must love you and i'm sure -- >> don't even try and do that -- i'm not a saddam hussein apoll gist -- i don't think he said is that great news. >> michael moore was booed off the stage for denouncing the invasion of iraq. so much for these bleeding heart liberals in hollywood. let us not forget the response from around the globe. u.n. secretary annan said the war was illegal. nelson mandela called it a threat to peace. pope john paul ii said the war would not solve problems of man. jesse jackson ca
attack damaged a hotel and a u.n. truck. the temporarily mod some damascus based staff to beirut and cairo and has asked all other u.n. personnel in the country to work from home until further note. the fighting in syria, damascus, has escalated in recent months. meanwhile, a bomb attack reportedly injured a rebel leader who was one of the federal to call for the syrian people to rise up against the syrian president. activists say somebody put a bomb in his car, and whoever that somebody is it on the loose and they had to amputate the guy's right leg. in another blow to the rebels, the president of the council has quit. jonathan hunt is with us. the opposition seems to be in chaos in terms of civilian leadership. >> civilian and military. the founder of the free syrian army is the guy who has apparently suffered serious injuries, perhaps even losing a leg, in this car bomb attack. that is a major blow to the unity of the army itself. he has been seen generally as a very effective general. his effectiveness now is obviously going to be in question. on top of that, you have the res
at least he's not going to go to the u.n.-- which he's now entitled to, whether it's the international criminal court or other agencies-- and keep pushing this unilateral recognition agenda. so nobody who's made that connection publicly or even privately to us but that is the kind of thing that's being looked at and i think quietly encouraged but then what the president kept saying today is pretty quickly when the talks start it can't be around these peripheral issues. it's got to be about security and borders. and once you settle those, the other issues go away like settlements. borders issue will settle the settlements issue. >> brown: very briefly margaret. even today while the president is there you have rockets coming in from gaza. is that seen as having any immediate impact or is that just more a sense of difficult these are very much still out there. >> i think it's the latter, jeff. if you had big demonstrations from the west bank that would be different but in fact it helps the president prove his point which is that the palestinian authority in the west bank has been doing a
specifically? guest: i spent five years in iraq as the u.n. spokesman, i got to know it intimately. let me tell you that iraq is a pretty much destroyed country. the constructed in many ways. physically and otherwise. there is no reconciliation. after 10 years of war in iraq we find that the country is more divided than ever. as we have seen from john kerry's visit today, the tensions between the united states and this government, not very cordial. imbued with a lot of tension. a lot coming back from the community of nations they have not really a implemented. i would say that it is all because of a constitution that failed the entire public at large. basically taking segments of society and addressing themselves to them. host: this unannounced trip that you just indicated in iraq, these officials with the president on his trip, the associated press pointed out that there were a series of meetings over flights. iran says that this is humanitarian aid and that syria is getting the weapons or else. guest: a whole concern, as the israelis feel that regardless of everything going on, they look to t
to the u.n. and a fox news contributor. general jack keane is also with us, a four-star retired general and former chief of staff of the u.s. army and a fox news military analyst. aaron david miller is a former advisor to six secretaries of state. he is also the author of, the much too promised land. aaron, let's start with you. this meeting has been written about, much-discussed in the united states. why now? why now for president obama to visit israel? >> oh, i think it is the intersection frankly of politics and policy. obama helped create his own israel problem and not that the prime minister of israel didn't air ba his fair share of the responsibility but the fact these two, probably with the exception of david ben guron and dwight d. eisenhower had most dysfunctional relationship between any american president and israeli prime minister. the president made a political calculation and he was vulnerable and exposed on this he had to take care of old business. too many people thought he was somehow hostile and adversary of the state of the israel. that coincides with policy on two is
between 1980-1988 with the iranians. a regime that invaded kuwait after which u.n. sanctions really put an additional strain on iraqi society, while at the same time strengthening the criminalize networked associate with saddam that really control the country and the police state there. the associated polarizing effect on iraq's communities, how they have become pitted against each other, how the regime had used weapons of mass destruction on his own people, the kurds in the north, and how he had persecuted the majority of the population, the shia population in the wake oof the 1991-92 gulf war. and so, and also other factors associated with his return to face initiatives and the use of really so lofty jihadi ideologies to return peoples frustrations away from his regime and towards the west and israel and so forth. in the context of his conspiracy. the effect that had on iraqi society. so understanding that human dimension of conflict and in particular understanding local conflicts that could occur, how these tribal ethnic, sectarian competition for power and resources to play out. and
-type force. he is going to the u.n. he is looking for the french to take a lot of the lead. he is going to be -- but nobody, even with both syria and with iran, there is no nobody particularly at the pentagon who is really wanting to do this right now. and barack obama least of all. chris: michael. >> chris, this poses problems, the perception which i think is accurate of our wearyness causes problems particularly in iran. people don't believe that this president really is willing to follow through on the use of force because they think that his head is still looking back at iraq. someone who spoke to him recently told me a few days ago that he has said about syria, words to the effect of "i know how i get in. tell me how i get out. i don't know how to get out." he is still thinking of what we got into unexpectedly in iraq, the unintended consequences of american action. it's a defining thing for him. chris: a sense of wisdom. let me ask you about this column. in terms of republican politics, and speak for that if you can, that they know that george w bush is basically identified comple
. >> the obama administration saw assad as a reformer in their words. it backed the u.n. diplomacy and bet on moscow to play a productive role. none of this worked. >> netanyahu's intelligence director said it's clear that the chemical weapons were used in syria. the chairman of the house intelligence committee said he believes that chemical weapons were used by the regime as a caveat. >> i like the see forensic evidence. >> embassy shuttered for year hedged on the chemical weapons. >> i can't tell you what happened. i can tell you we have a large team of people working on it. >> the syrian regime lost control with turkey and iraq. when they visit on friday, they are bracing for the possibility that the civil war could spread there. >> ed henry traveling with the president in jerusalem. thank you. now to iran, both leaders made clear they do not intend to allow the republic to get nuclear weapons. chief washington correspondent james rosen reports tonight there seems to be differences. >> they are not conveying how much divides them. >> i am convinced that the president is determined to pr
is a suspect to embargo. -- is subject to u.n. embargo. there is so much at stake here, if you could -- what specific leverage might the united states employed in those direct discussions that are taking place with the iraqis? intodo not want to go great detail here about our discussions with iraqis. we have discussed the united states resolution with the iraqis. in a sense, in the end, what matters is the government of iraq understand that its own interests will be best served not by facilitating the iranian efforts to prolong the crisis in syria, but rather in bringing about a transitional government that will have good relations with the government in iraq. >> understanding by the iraqi government would be helpful. action by the iraqi government would be necessary to ensure this takes place. i would like to focus on two types of aid. one is military. there is a difference of opinion here on capitol hill. about whether or not provide direct military assistance to the opposition. the argument is made that it is really hard to know where these weapons are going, that they might wind up in th
today said that the u.n. will conduct an investigation into the matter and said such a move would amount to crimes against humanity. now, yesterday, president obama said if an investigation shows the syrians did indeed use chemical weapons, weapons of mass destruction that would be a game-changer. and now it appears support in congress is sprouting for some kind of u.s. military action. to wit: a joint letter to the president, the chairman of the senate armed services committee, michigan democrat senator carl levin and the arizona republican senator john mccain today called for limited air strikes on certain syrian regime targets namely syrian air bases and missile batteries. "the fox report's" correspondent jonathan hunt is live at the united nations for us tonight. jonathan? this sounds like a significant u.n. investigation. >> well, yes, it certainly has the potential to be significant in that it could be the first independent, unbiased investigation into the several claims we have so far heard that chemical weapons have been used during the syrian civil war. on the other hand, remem
? guest: i spent five years in iraq as the u.n. spokesman, i got to know it intimately. let me tell you that iraq is a pretty much destroyed country. in many ways.d physically and otherwise. there is no reconciliation. war in iraq weof find that the country is more divided than ever. as we have seen from john they's visit today, tensions between the united , nots and this government very cordial. imbued with a lot of tension. a lot coming back from the community of nations they have not really a implemented. that it is all because of a constitution that failed the entire public at large. basically taking segments of society and addressing themselves to them. host: this unannounced trip that you just indicated in iraq, these officials with the president on his trip, the associated press pointed out that there were a series of .eetings over flights iran says that this is humanitarian aid and that syria is getting the weapons or else. concern, as the israelis feel that regardless of everything going on, they look to the north and in syria they see it disintegrating. weapons are flowing int
, if you want to continue to go down the u.n. road, down the route of international organizations, that's not a road that's going to lead anywhere. so let's focus on a road that has the potential to lead somewhere. i didn't mention on the israeli side -- i said there was a cop -- convergence on syria. there will be a discussion. you have 400,000 palestinians who are in syria and who are in a very vulnerable position, and it's hard to imagine, even if it's not a much of a public dimension, it's hard to imagine that's not going to be part of the private conversation. sure there will be a focus on the peace issue but also a focus on this, and what if anything we in the international community can be doing to somehow safeguard those palestinians who are there. i would say, with jordan, you're also going to have a public and private dimension. first of all,ing in is a signal of interest which is i think important. here the private dimension has to focus as much as anything on syria. you have 400,000 syrian refugees in jordan today. 100 thon additional since the begin of this year. if the pac
to go down the u.n. road, the route of moving and international organizations, that is not road that will lead anywhere. let's focus on a road that has the potential to lead somewhere. i did not mention on the israeli side, i said there was a convergence on syria, but there will be private discussions on syria in israel. there'll be a private discussion with palestinians on israel as well. you have four hundred thousand palestinians in syria who are in a very vulnerable position. imagine that that is not currently part of a private conversation. sure, there'll be a focus on peace, but there will also be a focus on this. what are we doing to safeguard the palestinians that are there? goingordan, you're also to have a public and private pension. englander sends a signal of interest, which it is important, but the private pension has to focus on syria as well. you have four hundred thousand assyrian refugees in jordan today. 100,000 additional since the beginning of this year. if that pace continues, you could have 700,000 by june. the impact on jordan is actually very hard to cont
with him that says, you know if you want to continue to go down the u.n. road, if you want to continue to go down the route of moving on the international organizations that's not a road that's going to lead anywhere. let's focus on a road that has the potential to lead somewhere. you know i didn't mention on the israeli side, i said there was a convergence on syria but there will certainly be a private discussion on syria and israel. there will be a private discussion with abu mazen on syria as well. you have 400,000 palestinians who are in syria and who are in a very vulnerable position and it's hard to imagine even if that is not much of a public dimension for the conversation it is hard to imagine that will not be part of the private conversation. sure there will be a focus on the peace issue but there will also be a focus on this and what if anything we in the international community could be doing to somehow safeguard those palestinians who are there. i would say with jordan you're also going to have a public and private dimension. first of all just being there sends a signal of
in the u.n. or the international criminal court. >> we'll see whacomes out. and then john kerry is going to follow up on this. but i suspect that from the way that the wording is coming out there may be a softening of positions on both sides on this in terms of settlement. a restraining settlement activity. >> rose: and palestinian initiatives in the u.n.. >> right. >> rose: okay. the last one is empower secretary of state kerry. >> he hasn't done that yet. he really needs to do it because he's given this speech which has raised expectations sky-high about what the united states is going to do in the peace process. and if he doesn't back kerry up, because kerry is the one that is going to be doing it, kerry won't be able to succeed. >> my guess is knowing secretary kerry and knowing secretary clinton, that secretary kerry will give this because he passionately is interested in this more tension, individually on his own, than secretary clinton. >> he says it that the time, sorry, that the time for middlest envoy is over. >> he is a secretary that is widely prceived as being verylose to th
, decision to invade kuwait then the u.n. sanctions that follow that in the effect it had on iraqi society made it all the more difficult for that society to move toward stability in the wake of the saddam hussein regime. i would blame al qaeda and iraq and those who used masss murder as a principal tactic in the war. i would ask dr. zbigniew brzezinski to visit the cities in iraq that were rocked by these murderous attacks and ask them who they blame. who blame the people committed those murders. in 2005 when we went to a city where life was choked out of it because of a systematic attack by al qaeda, they turned that city into their training base. it is with a connected sniper training, medical training. insurgencies just that happened because people to not like america. these are organizations that mobilize resources and people. this is an enemy organization. courses offer their included kidnapping and murder. they choked the life out of the city. schools have been closed for over a year. marketplaces have a cold. -- been closed. communities have fallen in on themselves -- marketplaces
? some syrian rebels have been designated as foreign terrorist organizations. they have captured u.n. peacekeepers after being released later. the u.s. must take necessary precautions and due diligence. can you give us more information about the opposition? they are not just syrian national. who are far and fighters have the islamic militants from neighboring countries. post-asidevern in a syria? on weapons of mass destruction, are reports correct the syrian regime might possess up to 50 tons of weapons-grade nuclear materials in its stockpile? true, willports are the u.s. call for an emergency meeting to discuss this and if assad does not grant inspectors immediate access to all nuclear facilities and stockpiles so they can be protected, will the u.s. impose and mediate, comprehensive, and painful sanctions? will we do sell acting with the european union? lastly, on the countries that are aiding the brutality of regime, these countries continue to provide military assistance, weaponry, and they seek to further the illegal weapons program in supporting these foreign terrorist organiz
costly war between 1980 and 1988 with the iranians. a regime that had invaded kuwait after which u.n. sanctions really put an additional strain on iraqi society while at the same time strengthening the criminalize patronage networks associated with so there really control the country and the police state there. the associated polarizing effect on the community's poorer but they have become pitted against each other. how the regime had used weapons of mass destruction of his own people, the kurds in the north and how he persecuted the majority of the population, the shia population in the wake of the 91-92 gulf war. and also other factors associated with his return tough trade initiatives and the use of really appear 11 ideology to turn people's frustrations away from the regime in toward the west and israel and so forth. the context of the crusader conspiracy. in fact the fact that had on the iraqi society. so understanding that the human dimension and in particular understanding global conflict that could occur, how these trouble ethnic sectarian competition for power resources woul
: you said that the u.n. has weighed in. >> the high commissioner for human rights has a special envoy which concluded that it violates international standards of human rights. each the u.n. doesn't get t. germany doesn't get it, the obama administration doesn't get t. i am hope that this sixth circuit will get it right. >> shannon: please, keep us updated. >> i will. thank you very much. >> shannon: who can fob get the tragedy story about the sinkhole that swallowed a man sleeping in his bedroom. there is another sinkhole a mile away that has florida residents on edge. still to come... fair and balanced and a feisty debate about whether the union workers in michigan have a right to be mad. hey, our salads. [ bop ] [ bop ] [ bop ] you can do that all you want, i don't like v8 juice. [ male announcer ] how about v8 v-fusion. a full serving of vegetables, a full serving of fruit. but what you taste is the fruit. so even you... could've had a v8. [ construction sounds ] ♪ [ watch ticking ] [ engine revs ] come in. ♪ got the coffee. that was fast. we're outta here. ♪ [ engine revs ]
and humanitarian missions since the u.n. was founded. of the well aware troubles in ireland over a 30- year time and how painful that was and how it affected life on our island brutally, tragically, and involved an enormous scale of response from some many people. many people. the hatred and loss was written over our timely -- tiny island. democracy and the region and the pursuit of democratic ideals, they were part of peace. the united states and america played its part in that area -- in that. america, in its pursuit of democracy, united us in so many ways. thatall being in this city in 1996 when the clinton administration called meetings from a business and political point of view. i remember senator george mitchell speaking about democracy. i remember him recalling his own family's involvement because of immigration from ireland in economic circumstances, that this country gave him the democratic opportunity to serve as senate leader for 20 years. he was followed at that meeting by ron brown, who tragically lost his life in a plane crash sometime later. george about democracy, mitchell point
commission. and the country is better off for it. on the 17 u.n. resolutions in front of -- they were questioning saddam hussein. on the last resolution, it was a vote of 15-0 in the national security council. russia, china and syria voted. it wasn't as if it was a republican idea. the world thought saddam hussein -- >> greg: you can't get that -- >> dana: you can't get that cooperation now. >> greg: what do you think, eric? >> eric: let's talk about what happened. remember that saddam hussein aligned his troops. he took the border of kuwait and he was going to kuwait. not speculation if he was a bad guy. he was a bad guy. he didn't go to kuwait. he lined them up and we did desert storm and stopped them. he lit the kuwaiti oil field on fire but didn't go to kuwait to take the country down. he decided to light the oil fields on fire. we had to take saddam hussein out. we had been punched in the face with 9/11. afghanistan war was starting up. we had to do what we did. it's the smartest thing george bush did. restored confidence in america. >> dana: one other point. a tease. quad gaddaf
where the president stood at the u.n. where he advocated to not recognize palestine as an independent state there is room for grievance. let me ask you, jane where is there room for hope? >> well, americans i think we really are the people who bring hope to a region who are locked in this. i agree that the continued settlement growth is a tremendous obstacle. i think it makes life difficult for the palestinians, and i think it makes life difficult for the israelis in terms of what it does to the israeli soul. but i do think that people much smarter in geography than i am have figured out in fact, it is possible still maybe the window is closing but it is possible to carve out a viable palestine state that will require a lot of resettlement by israelis unless they want to live there, and one hopes that just as 20% of israelis are arabs, there might be jews who would be willing with regard to a new palestinian state. however, that window is closing no doubt about it with the rate that the bitter rates are happening and settlement growth is occurring there is an urgency now upon the lead
a speech to the u.n. on wmds. watch this. >> he walked in my office with a sheet of papers on my hand and threw it down and said that's the script of my presentation at the united nations. it came from the vice president's office. it was junk. it was pure junk. i was in charge of putting it together. >> powell and wilkerson tear up the original 48-page script and start over with a team from the state department and cia. director george tenant suggests they base their presentation on the national intelligence estimate, which unbeknownst to paul is a deeply flawed document. >> we went into a room and he said sit down and he sat down. we were the only two people in the room. he looked at me and said, this bull [ bleep ] of contacts with al qaeda has got to be taken out. >> we found out powell and wilkerson both wanted to take out the al qaeda connection to suddam. so what happened? >> well, it doesn't come out. it remains to be part of the case that -- >> even though they knew it was garbage? >> yeah. and one of the things that's hard to reconcile with is the figure of colin powell in al
colin powell made that infamous just outlandish presentation to the u.n., four washington post-columnists cheered him saying there's no debate anymore. sadaam hussein has to be taken out. mainstream media was by far probably the worst failure of the last half century. >> war always good for ratings. i'd like to ask you about what the organization of women's freedom in iraq entails answered what are your thoughts today on this 10 year anniversary? i remember in 2003 when i decided to go back home, and the idea was that this war cannot bring anything good to iraq. you cannot bring anything good by bombing and killing. it's an arsenal of killing that was sent to the other side of the world. women cannot benefit from that. and besides we had the feeling that creating the vacuum in iraq would bring in the bad influences of the region, with some of them that come from saudi arabia, some from iran and that cannot be good for iraqi women. in the previous regime time, which was under a dictatorship, but still women were able to be educated, go to work and i'm an example of that. i was a
. if the u.s. provides $3 billion to israel and it's vetoed out of the u.n. security council this it's unwilling to take us to the finish line and i think we need to internationalize this issue. that's the palestinian responsibility to international jaz it. there's clear support in the u.n. general assembly to do more and better than the u.s. has been able to do. >> again one of the reasons i was so pleased with what we saw with what president obama said and with what the world hear president obama say he severely explained this is what the united states policy is. it begins with israeli children and palestinian children. deserve a better future. how we going give to it them. second the way to do that is two states side-by-side and then third the way to get to two states is the through direct negotiations. you may not agree with that third step. i hope people will. but the fact is we start with what's the best way to achieve what israeli and palestinian parents want for their children and one another. >> is that perfect example of the dual role. the position of direct negotiations is
resolution that gets voted on at the u.n. as we are flying back from the region, back to the u.s. on that trip that you, that we were discussing. we went to paris, we went to paris, egypt and then tunis. and it's in the course of those four days that that decision is made. so the conversation was very much, you know, the french are going to go ahead. we can let them do whatever they want, or we can actually try to shape this into something that is going to deliver people. >> host: i think my favorite chapter in the book is the trip to burma, perhaps because it's might be the most, i think, historical. >> guest: yes. i love that chapter. >> host: and just talk about what made that trip so unique. obviously, not very many people are traveling to burma at least from the united states at that time. >> guest: more and more, but certainly at the time it was very, very novel. you know, it was a very special moment, and it goes back to, um, when you look at the big picture of what, you know, my book will do for readers, this is a book that is several things. it is, you know, my persona
to protect civilians. that's the final resolution that gets voted on at the u.n., as we are flying back from the region, back to the u.s. on that trip that we were discussing, we went to paris. we went to paris, egypt and into this. it's in the course of those four days that that decision is made. so the conversation was very much, the french are going to go ahead. we can let them do whatever they want or we can try to shape us into something that is going to deliver. >> host: i think my favorite chapter in the book is the trip to burma, perhaps because it might be the most historical. >> guest: i love that chapter. >> host: just talk about what made that trip so unique. obvious that not very many people have gone to burma. >> guest: more and more of a string of the time it was very novel. you know, it was a very special moment, and it goes back to when you look at the big picture of what, no, my book will do for readers. is this is a book that is several things. it is, you know, my personal story, my perspective on american power. it is the story of hillary clinton as secretary of state and
was with one of the former heads of the u.n. in iraq begging joe biden to call him as a witness to talk about the lack of wmds in iraq. they refused. so there are key members of this administration, the secretary of state, john kerry, the vice president, joe biden, who also have to answer for their role in this. people like wolfowitz, cheney, rumsfeld, should not be given any kind of honor in this society. they should be held accountable for the u.s. soldiers that were killed and i think it's many more than 100,000 iraqis that were killed. >> i'm sure. mike, former bush speechwriter david frumm has written a column in which he reveals long conversations held in 2002 with dick cheney. according to frumm, the two men talked less about promoting democracy and how iraq might become a source of oil to the united states. mike, was cheap oil really at the heart of this invasion? >> you know, i wouldn't go that far, martin, but i would say that fears that the persian gulf could be disrupted by saddam and oil, therefore, become much more expensive were certainly part of it. i'm not a huge fan of most
the beginning. i thought if there's a reason to invade another country, having to make a case in front of the u.n. assembly doesn't seem like it is warranted. war should be obvious, the reason should be obvious. >> nada bakos, former cia analyst, thank you so much for joining us tonight. >> thank you. >> friday at 9:00 p.m., watch a special replay of hubris, selling the iraq war, followed by talking hubris. >>> coming up, how losing presidential campaigns can lead to a rewarding career as a tv commercial actor. >>> and stephen colbert's sister was a big winner in south carolina. we will have the latest in that congressional race coming up. re. hmm, we need a new game. ♪ that'll save the day. ♪ so will bounty select-a-size. it's the smaller powerful sheet. the only one with trap + lock technology. look! one select-a-size sheet of bounty is 50% more absorbent than a full size sheet of the leading ordinary brand. use less. with the small but powerful picker upper, bounty select-a-size. a talking car. but i'll tell you what impresses me. a talking train. this ge locomotive can tell you exactly wh
. all the way there in new york where you are. the u.n. security council tonight behind closed doors, ambassadors from around the world, went behind closed doors to discuss the syrian chemical weapons situation. as you noted, it also dominated here in jerusalem. the press conference the president had with the israeli prime minister. he made very clear while this is still being investigated, they plan to hold the syrian regime accountable. take a listen. >> when you start seeing weapons that can cause potential devastation and mass casualties, and you let that genie out of the bottle. then you are looking potentially at even more horrific scenes than we have already seen in syria. and the international community has to act on that additional information. >> the international community has to act. that is the suggestion about action, at least down the road. i spoke a few moments ago to an israeli official here who says their fear in the israeli government is just not about the syrian regime using chemical weapons in the days ahead whether they did or not in recent days. also their chem
matters. the u.n. is not irrelevant. >> citing international law in those days could make you a laughing stock on television, but janine garofalo hung in there, she was ridiculed mercilessly. the prowar world, including republicans and democrats tried to turn her into a lefty hollywood caricature. none of them have ever apologized, even though they now know that she was right and the president of the united states was wrong and his highly trained foreign policy team and war policy team was wrong. >> the problem here is that there will always be some uncertainty about how quickly he can acquire nuclear weapons, but we don't want the smoking gun to be a mushroom cloud. >> we all remember that howard dean was right about the invasion of iraq and michael moore was right. and when michael moore won an oscar in 2003, in his acceptance speech he spoke of a president, quote, sending us to war for fictitious reasons. and he was booed in hollywood by a large segment of the oscar audience in that theater that night. the long list of actors opposed to invading iraq included diane carol, done cheat h
state and a viable independent palestinian state. >> but israel is already a state. it is u.n. recognized. it is a state. the two-state solution presumes that israel isn't already a state. and abbas has written that he will never recognize israel's sovereignty. and creating a two states will only give them cause to internationalize a legal conflict with israel. >> the reality as we know it now, this is not, i'm not really debating this particular question. it is israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu who does not truly accept what we call a settlement based on a two-state solution. an independent, viable state. for the palestinians, in the west bank and gaza and occupied east jerusalem in a viable independent israeli state in the very heart of the arab world. you're absolutely correct. israel is an independent state. the question to you and to many israelis, israel must embed itself in its environment. israel must be integrated into the region as a good citizen as long as the palestinians, and i'm both as a scholar of the middle east and also as an american. as long as the
change in iraq. you know, in the glass one-quarter full side, they had elections. the u.n. validated the results. they weren't fraudulent. they were a lot more honest than they were in afghanistan. they have a parliament. the council of representatives. they passed a budget recently. there is political life in iraq. it's--y. it's-- whatever malikis an authoritarian figure but he's nothing like a saddam by anybody's estimation. so i just-- while there are reasons to be concerned in iraq and reasons to worry about the future, i don't think we should paint an entirely dark picture. and i think if you asked iraqis you'd get different perspectives. if you asked the kurds, i think they're glad there was the invasion. they have more autonomy than they've ever had before, having relations with the turks. if you ask the shi'a, they were empowered but there are probably-- despite the fact they're empowered, there are elements that resent the americans. resent the invasion because they were lodged from the top of the pyramid but theyt miss the americans, many of them, because we're not there in
and soil to a u.n. team along with rocket debris. secretary of state john kerry has strong words for iraq's prime minister. do something to stop the flights of iranian weapons to syria. the visit to bag dad comes amid growing concern over iraq's role in the syrian conflict. iraqi officials deny allowing the transfer of weapons through iraqi air space to president al assad's regime. in england police say a full inquiry is underway into the mysterious death of the russian boris berezovsky. outspoken critic of putin calling for his overthrow. berezovsky was found dead in his mansion near london where he lived in exile. he was a target of an assassination attempt in russia in 1994. he was found wounded and his driver killed when a car bomb exploded. >>> hundreds turned out at the karachi airport to welcome home former pakistani president pervez musharraf. musharraf fled the country as a dictator. but after four years of self-imposed exile he arrives back in pakistan today. he said he came back to save his country. and plan to run for office again. >> where are those people now that said i wou
look good for a press release to be able to say you're getting some progress in the u.n. but the only way we're going to be able to achieve that two-state solution is through direct negotiations. >> abbas has also threatened to report israel to the international criminal court for human rights violations. do you think that overall that this trip is really a lot about sort of managing relationships more than solving problems? >> well, i think the relationships are extremely important. if the palestinians went to the international criminal court, that would set back, i think, the prospects for peace and the two-state solution. i think the president will make that clear. but i do think establishing the personal relationships, talking to the people, very important. the united states will play a critical role and those personal relationships could take you a long way. >> senator ben cardin, always good to see you. thank you for coming on the program. matt, do you have a sense of what the white house would consider a successful trip? >> that's an interesting question. i think if he gets goo
the prophe prophet o. what the president should have done at the u.n. is slammed his fist on the u.n. podium and say, in no uncertain terms to the delegates, the future does not belong to the lowlife murderers who kill innocent americans. [applause] the future belongs to americans who are willing to lay their lies down on the line to protect our right of free speech. and we will never give up that right, just like will never give up our second amendment rights either. [applause] that would have been from our president a message of caring. meanwhile, here at home, our nation is facing what will likely be the biggest nonmilitary crisis in our history. you see, the president has resigned over a war, a war on the young, by putting a $6 trillion more in debt. that is a war on the young. that is in caring about you. that is an caring about your future. that isn't caring about america. because we have enemies are conducting deadly cyber attacks against us, and yet, our president continue to borrow billions of dollars from them. that, too, is conducting a war against the young. that isn't caring abo
of u.n.h. has made over $1 billion in salary and perks in the last decade of united health care. i mean, so that's where a lot of this money's going for. i've just been steaming the last three days. my three to four biggest lies about iraq, number one, larry lindsey, the advisor chief economic advisor to bush still appears regularly on cnbc claimed the iraq war would cost 100 to 200 billion. he was fired. number two. hal: $2.2 trillion is the number. caller: yeah. hal: that's the soft number. caller: yeah. hal: it will not cost any less than that. caller: you can't make this stuff up. hal: $100 billion. caller: this is a quote verbatim, i would be shocked if this takes longer than six months. it's now 10 years. hal: right the longest war in american history. caller: how many people, cheney, rumsfeld said, we have said al-qaeda is involved, they're going to hand off weapons to al-qaeda al-qaeda, al-qaeda. how many times did we hear that? exactly from dick cheney himself, who at the time he said it knew it was absolutely false. we have to go to break. there are a lot of calls. you bring u
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